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Far too many are dying.

All it takes is one simple test.

A finger poke that costs rarely more than $1 retail.

Only $1 to save a life.

Isn’t that money worth spending?

Amanda says it so well in her post linked below.

Why We Can’t Afford to Ignore the Symptoms.

 

Click the image for more information about Diabetes Blog Week or to join.

Friday: Just like in the movie, today we’re doing a swap. If you could switch chronic diseases, which one would you choose to deal with instead of diabetes? And while we’re considering other chronic conditions, do you think your participation in the DOC has affected how you treat friends and acquaintances with other medical conditions?

If you could switch chronic diseases, which one would you choose to deal with instead of diabetes?

The initial thought that comes to my head is NONE, THEY ALL SUCK! But I guess that wouldn’t be in the spirit of Blog Week. In all honesty, I don’t know a lot about other chronic diseases. A little of this and a little of that, but nothing like the knowledge I have about diabetes. I’m not going to name a chronic disease that I’d rather switch to, to me that seems like I’d be saying that they have it easier than people who live with diabetes do. That would seem a little unkind to me. But I will say that if there is one that only involves remembering to pop a little pill once or twice a day and then forget about it until the next dose, please sign me up.

And while we’re considering other chronic conditions, do you think your participation in the DOC has affected how you treat friends and acquaintances with other medical conditions?

No, absolutely not. One does not need to live with a chronic condition in order to have compassion for or give respect to others living with medical conditions. I will say, though, that perhaps I do have better empathy, even as a caregiver, of the emotional and physical tolls that it can take on a person.

Will She Get Better? Soccer mom asked at our recent game.

But, I didn’t find myself getting upset at the ignorance. She was sincere and I could hear the hope in her voice.

“No,” I answered, “it will never go away. But we get better at it.”

The mom between us just nodded her head in understanding.

She replied that she knew it wasn’t the same as the kind her dad has, but she was hopeful.

And she asked about her devices.

And she listened attentively.

And then we went back to the cheering on our girls in the game.

 

I understand the knee jerk reaction in responding to ignorance.

Especially when they are accusatory.

Those especially sting, because I know that even I searched for a reason in the beginning.

I wanted to know why and 5+ years later, I still don’t have that answer.

But I think it is important to remember to not go on the defensive anytime someone asks a question.

It gets old, I know.

But take a breath and evaluate the motive. Think about your answer and how you will deliver it.

Not everyone is going to blame you.

And the ones who do. Deliver with a little snark.

June 2017
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